1. faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go Texas! http://thefaultinourstarsmovie.com/demandourstars 

Come to Texas. Some of us TFIOS fans are old!

    faultinourstarsmovie:

    One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go Texas! http://thefaultinourstarsmovie.com/demandourstars 

    Come to Texas. Some of us TFIOS fans are old!

  2. Fear is the Root of Your Problems : zenhabits →

    Leo Babauta summing it all up perfectly. 

  3. Royal Society Signature Book →

    Such history all in one place.

  4. Great Poster Design Work →

  5. Stuff I'm reading →

  6. Testing IFTT

    Posting to tumblr to see if it shows on Wordpress. Thanks IFTT

  7. Parseltongue →

    I hope Melina sees this:

    linguismstics:

    I went to a talk given by the man who developed Parseltongue for the Harry Potter films, Prof Francis Nolan. Just a few ‘facts’ about the language with some of the ‘explanations’ given:

    Phonology

    It’s got no rounded vowels or labial consonants (because snake lips aren’t very flexible)

    It’s got…

  8. 'Tis and 10 other fun proclitic words →

    allthingslinguistic:

    Arika Okrent has a nice list of holiday (ish) proclitics, including ‘tis, ‘twas, and the not-terribly-festive y’all:

    English likes to stick contractions on the end of words. “They have” becomes “they’ve,” “I will” becomes “I’ll,” and “do not” becomes “don’t.” The shortened parts of these words are called enclitics — they are a bit more independent than suffixes, but like suffixes, they attach to the ends of words. English also used to have a number of proclitics — shortened words that attach to the beginning of other words. Most proclitic words are now archaic or obsolete, but every December the neglected proclitics get their revenge, as a holiday avalanche of “‘tis” rolls through town.

    'Tis, a shortening of “it is,” has a Dickensian, Christmasy ring to it. For a time, it was far more common in writing than its counterpart “it's.” The final shift from “‘tis” to “it's” took place in the middle of the 19th century, when Dickens was writing his novels. That was also when the lyrics to “Deck the Halls” were first published. “‘Tis the season” is now so deeply embedded in our linguistic consciousness that the perfectly normal phrase “it's the season” just sounds weird, like Mick Jagger singing “I can't get any satisfaction.”

    Another fun set are old-timey swear words, such as zounds (from God’s wounds), ‘struth, and ‘sblood. 

    Clitics are a type of morpheme that is midway between a full word and an affix: they depend on another word but not as tightly as an affix. Just like we can have prefixes and suffixes, we can also have proclitics (before the word they lean on) and enclitics (after the word they lean on). Apparently there are also mesoclitics and endoclitics which are like the infixes of the clitic world, but they’re pretty rare. 

  9. maggie-stiefvater:

    Novelist error messages.

  10. Hallways

    The low drone of the heater, with it’s base hum accompaniment, trades noise for warmth as I wait for my wife’s chore craft to finish. Soon, I’ll be back here with a carcass full of joy. I hope the place is still standing so I can stand here again.